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Lost Maples

Lost Maples

Lost Maples State Natural Area covers 2174.2 scenic acres on the Sabinal River. Visitors enjoy picnicking, camping, backpacking, sightseeing, hiking, photography, birdwatching, fishing, swimming, and nature study. The park is home to the state’s largest known species of the bigtooth, also known as the Uvalde bigtooth maple and canyon maple which present an awe-inspiring fall foliage, but the park is a destination that will not disappoint year ’round.

Fredericksburg to Lost Maples State Natural Area

From Fredericksburg, Texas, take Hwy 16 (Adams Street) to Kerrville. In Kerrville, pass under I-10 & take Loop 534 to your left. It goes around Kerrville and intersects Hwy 173 on the opposite end of town. Turn left on 173 toward Bandera. Go about 15 miles & you will see Farm to Market Road 2828 on your right. Turn Right and go about 9 miles. It will intersect with HWY 16. Turn right onto Hwy 16. Continue 2 miles to Medina where you will turn left on Hwy 337 and proceed 20 miles to the intersection of 337 and  Hwy 187. Turn right onto 187. Continue 5 miles to the park entrance.

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Lost Maples State Natural Area

Lost Maples State Natural Area covers 2174.2 scenic acres in Bandera and Real Counties, north of Vanderpool on the Sabinal River. Acquired by purchase from private owners in 1973 -1974, the site was opened to the public on September 1, 1979. The annual visitation is approximately 200,000 visitors.

Archaeological evidence shows that this area was used by prehistoric peoples at various times. In historic times, which began with Spanish exploration and colonization efforts in the late 17th century, the Apache, Lipan Apache, and Comanche Indians ranged over the land and posed a threat to settlement well into the 19th century.

Visitors enjoy picnicking, camping, backpacking, sightseeing, hiking, photography, birdwatching, fishing, swimming, and nature study. People should stay on designated trails, because maples have a shallow root system, and soil compaction from walking can damage the trees. Also, many natural hazards exist due to the steep/rugged terrain. Do not hike or climb on rocks or hillsides.

Facilities provided include restrooms with showers, picnic sites, primitive camping areas, a comfort station, campsites with water and electricity, and a trailer dump station. There is a Texas State Park Store, approximately 1/2-mile of nature trails, and 11 miles of hiking trails. Accessibility for the disabled: restrooms and picnic tables; can drive approximately 1 mile into park to view foliage.

The park is an outstanding example of Edwards Plateau flora and fauna. It is a combination of steep, rugged limestone canyons, springs, plateau grasslands, wooded slopes, and clear streams. It features a large, isolated stand of uncommon Uvalde Bigtooth Maple, whose fall foliage can be spectacular. Generally, the foliage changes the last two weeks of October through the first two weeks of November. The park is extremely popular during the fall and is often crowded.

Parking is limited to 250 cars, so for maximum enjoyment and serenity, we suggest visitors schedule trips during the weekdays, if possible.

Rare species of birds, such as the Green Kingfisher, can be seen year-round. The endangered Black-capped vireo and Golden-cheeked warbler nest and feed in the park in spring and early summer. Wild animals include gray fox, white-tailed deer, armadillo, raccoon, bobcat, rock squirrel, and javelina.

Open: 7 days a week year-round except during public hunts. No gate. Busy Season: October and November and spring, March through May.

Information and prices are subject to change. Please call the park or park information (1-800-792-1112) for the latest updates.

Entrance Fees

  • From December – September:
    • $5 per day, per person 13 and older, staying for day use only.
    • $3 per day, per person 13 and older, staying overnight
  • From October – November:
    • $6 per day, per person 13 and older, staying for day use only.
    • $3 per day, per person 13 and older, staying overnight
  • Group School-Sponsored Trip entrance fee per person (not for overnight stays):
    • $1 – $5 Contact the Park to make arrangements and for pricing.
  • Special Entrance Rates for:
    • Texas State Parks Pass Holders.
    • Youth Group Annual Entrance Permit Holders.
    • Texas Parklands Passport (Bluebonnet Pass) Holders.
  • Children 12 and under (free)

Camping

  • Maximum 8 people per campsite unless otherwise noted.
  • Applicable daily entrance fees are charged in addition to the campsite or facility fee.
    • There are 40 Hike-in (minimum 1 mile) primitive campsites: $8 per 6 people, per night
    • There are 30 Campsites with water and electric hookups: $15 per night.

Additional Charges

  • Excess Vehicle Parking (number restricted at some parks.): $2
  • Activity Use Fee Per Person (day or overnight): $3

Notes

  • Applicable daily entrance fees are charged in addition to the campsite or facility fee.
  • Pets are not allowed in any Texas State Park buildings. For other general pet restrictions check the Texas State Park Regulations. For park specific pet restrictions contact the park.
  • Call the park or park information (1-800-792-1112) for more information.

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